• Friday, Aug 12, 2022
  • Last Update : 04:24 pm

Social resistance must to stamp out militancy

  • Published at 01:54 am July 2nd, 2017
Social resistance must to stamp out militancy
While the nation is marking the first anniversary of the deadly terrorist attack at Holey Artisan Bakery at Gulshan in Dhaka, eminent citizens have opined that social resistance is an imperative to purge the country of religious prejudice and extremism. They have said it would be difficult for the government to tackle the problem alone. Therefore people from all walks of life should come forward and resist violent extremism. Hundreds of people, including foreigners and relatives of the victims, flocked to the Holey Artisan Bakery premises to pay homage to victims of the attack early on Saturday. They underscored the need for a nationwide unity and resistance at the grassroots level for a positive social change. After paying homage, Rasheda K Chowdhury, former advisor to a caretaker government, said: “We should not blame only the government or the state for the militancy problem. We have to be conscious about our own responsibilities. We must find out why our youths are drawn into militancy and take actions accordingly.” Raising questions over parents’ role in prevention of extremism, she asked: “How much careful are our parents and relatives about providing righteous education to their children?” The prominent academic put emphasis on ensuring social coherence among the people in order to eliminate all sorts of narrowness and orthodoxy. Noted Rabindra Sangeet artiste Dr Chanchal Khan said: “For children, family is the most important place where they can learn basic education and morality.” Education needs to start from family, and children should be taught to make positive changes in the society and live harmoniously and non-communally, he stressed. “If we can teach our children social values and morality, then our society will automatically step forward,” Dr Khan added. Co-founder and Managing Director of Plus One Services Rubaba Dowla said: “We are yet to find out who were behind the barbaric killings. We must find out the culprits who are luring our youths into wrong paths.” Highlighting the need for family education for each child to stamp out militancy, she said: “We want to see an end to terrorist acts.” Cultural personality Shomi Kaiser said though the government’s measures to fight militancy were commendable, the country was still lacking in social and cultural efforts at the grassroots level to deal with the problem. “Educational institutions should take a hard stand against militant activities, and a cultural revolution may play a vital role in this regard,” she stressed.