• Monday, Aug 08, 2022
  • Last Update : 03:54 pm

Chobi Mela: Translocal Solidarity Networks launched

  • Published at 07:22 pm February 23rd, 2021
Dr Kirsten Hackenbroch, Goethe-Institut Bangladesh’s Director (left) and Tanzim Wahab, Director and Curator of Chobi Mela (right) speaking at the Chobi Mela (Shunno) event - Courtesy
Dr Kirsten Hackenbroch, Goethe-Institut Bangladesh’s Director (left) and Tanzim Wahab, Director and Curator of Chobi Mela (right) speaking at the Chobi Mela (Shunno) event Courtesy

The initiative is looking into creating support structures for vulnerable cultural organisations and practitioners in South Asia

On the fourth day of Chobi Mela, the Translocal Solidarity Networks initiative was launched dedicated to the theme of solidarity with a special edition called “Shunno”.

Translocal Solidarity Networks is a new, self-critical initiative that thrives to transform into a dynamic movement of knowledge production for critical and socially motivated artist projects and inclusive cultural leadership, said a press statement. 

This network will function as a participatory and self-critical hub for socially committed artists and cultural organisations across South Asia.

The initiative’s partner consortium consists of Chobi Mela and Goethe-Institut offices across South Asia – including Bangladesh, Kolkata, Chennai, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka.

Dr Kirsten Hackenbroch, Goethe-Institut Bangladesh’s Director (left) and Tanzim Wahab, Director and Curator of Chobi Mela (right) speaking at the Chobi Mela (Shunno) event | Courtesy

Tanzim Wahab, Chobi Mela’s festival director and curator, and Dr Kirsten Hackenbroch, Goethe-Institut Bangladesh’s director, presented the concept of Translocal Solidarity Networks.

They said that the idea took shape, while observing how socially engaged artists and cultural organisations frequently face challenges regarding the environment they work and structures they operate in.

The initiative is looking into creating support structures for vulnerable cultural organisations and practitioners in South Asia.

“The project aspires to form a starting point for developing collective measures to address concerns of civil society, cultural institutions and socially committed artists,” said Kirsten Hackenbroch.

Wahab and Hackenbroch emphasised the importance of safe spaces and the creation of tailor-made forums to foster discourse. Besides, the multilinguality of the region and its cultural scenes were also mentioned as important factors.

Translocal Solidarity Networks strives to offer an open hub for people to join and claim their presence. An online platform will allow artist collectives, cultural policy makers, and art professionals to locate themselves and get involved. The platform will also include comprehensive archives, free manuals, and guidelines.

Workshops and webinars will be facilitated on topics like- protection, equality, solidarity, and navigating in volatile environments.